Saturday, April 21, 2012

"The principles of Jefferson are the definitions & axioms of free society.” – Abe Lincoln

Happy Birthday, Thomas Jefferson!

JEFFERSONIAN

"Under the Law of Nature, All Men are Born Free." - Thomas Jefferson

‎All Honor to Thomas Jefferson

The National Debt and The Vitriol Against Jefferson

Reason Reigns

A High-Speed Rail, Thomas Jefferson, and James J. Hill

Thomas Jefferson - The Mind of the American Revolution

Revered Quotes

Are you a Jeffersonian or a Reaganite?

Tea Partiers

Mitt Romney, Thomas Jefferson, and the Injustice of Context Dropping  









25 comments:

Ilyn Ross said...

“A wise and frugal Government, which shall restrain men from injuring one another, shall leave them otherwise free to regulate their own pursuits of industry and improvement, and shall not take from the mouth of labor the bread it has earned. This is the sum of good government.” - Thomas Jefferson

http://www.ilynross.blogspot.com/2012/04/principles-of-jefferson-are-definitions.html

Ilyn Ross said...

Thomas Jefferson on Washington

http://www.firstinpeace.com/?page_id=488

Ilyn Ross said...

Thomas Jefferson is the only one I agree with a hundred percent. He is the most glorious human who ever lived. Lincoln said that Jefferson's principles are the definitions and axioms of free society. My favorite Mitt Romney video shows Jefferson as Romney talks of principles.

The anti-freedom lie about Jefferson. The Texas Education Board want him deleted from some history books. Their fellow theocrats admire Palin, and Santorum associates Jefferson's wall of separation to the KKK. Some historians shamelessly lie about Jefferson; a website named after him, the Thomas Jefferson Encyclopedia, malevolently lies about him.

By his actions as a serial deficit eradicator and surplus creator, Romney has evinced that he is a Jeffersonian. It is a delight to hear him extol the American Revolutionaries. I admire his courageous defense of corporations, while Obama, Paul, and the ilk of Antitrust thugs like Mt. Rushmore fraud Theodore Roosevelt, lust to cannibalize investors and corporate America.

I am mightily disappointed when Romney says we can be better and bigger than ourselves. Such a statement is anti individualism, the principle of individual rights. Unlike him, I am pro-life and pro-choice; they are not contradictory, since the zygote is not yet an actual living human. I am for civil unions.

http://www.facebook.com/mittromney#!/photo.php?fbid=336597053078769&set=a.152412418163901.39600.152409941497482&type=1&theater

Ilyn Ross said...

Philip R. Jasper: ‎"Thomas Jefferson is the Greatest Man whom the American Democracy has yet produced."

Alexis de Tocqueville, historian and political leader. Spoken in 1831.

Ilyn Ross said...

"Jefferson even went so far as to ban the teaching of Theology altogether. In a letter to Thomas Cooper in October 1814, Jefferson stated, "a professorship of theology should have no place in our institution" and, true to form, the University never had a Divinity school or department, and was established independent of any religious sect. Replacing the then-standard specialization in Religion, the University undertook groundbreaking specializations in scientific subjects such as Astronomy and Botany. (However, today the University does maintain one of the highest-rated Religious Studies departments in the U.S. and a non-denominational chapel, notably absent from Jefferson's original plans, was constructed in 1890 near the Rotunda.)"

http://www.universityvisitorsnetwork.com/colleges/University-of-Virginia

Ilyn Ross said...

He who receives an idea from me, receives instruction himself without lessening mine; as he who lights his taper at mine, receives light without darkening me. That ideas should freely spread from one to another over the globe, for the moral and mutual instruction of man, and improvement of his condition, seems to have been peculiarly and benevolently designed by nature, when she made them, like fire, expansible over all space, without lessening their density in any point, and like the air in which we breathe, move, and have our physical being, incapable of confinement or exclusive appropriation. Inventions then cannot, in nature, be a subject of property. Society may give an exclusive right to the profits arising from them, as an encouragement to men to pursue ideas which may produce utility, but this may or may not be done, according to the will and convenience of the society, without claim or complaint from anybody...(letter to Isaac McPherson, 1813 as cited in Kock & Peden, 1972).

http://www.earlyamerica.com/review/winter2000/jefferson.html

Ilyn Ross said...

Thomas Jefferson was a founding father not only of America, but also of American science.

http://www.realclearscience.com/blog/2012/02/thomas-jefferson-citizen-scientist.html

Ilyn Ross said...

Thomas Jefferson was a pioneer. Of this you are undoubtedly aware. He played a pivotal role in crafting the Declaration of Independence. He helped mold and nurture our political system when it was young and susceptible to corruption. He struck the greatest bargain of all time when he arranged for the purchase of the Louisiana Territory from France.

What you might not know about Jefferson was that he was a "statesman of science." For over two decades -- including the time when he was President of the United States -- Jefferson served as president of the American Philosophical Society, the preeminent scientific foundation at the time (and coincidentally founded by Benjamin Franklin). In this dual role, he effectively served as America's scientific leader, as well as its political leader.

"Nature intended me for the tranquil pursuits of science, by rendering them my supreme delight..." Jefferson said in 1809.

As this quote makes overt, Jefferson was supremely fascinated by science. His hobbies included -- among many others -- paleontology, archaeology and agriculture, each subjects to which he made noted contributions. In addition, he absolutely adored mathematics. "When I was young, mathematics was the passion of my life," he said.

Ilyn Ross said...

In government, Jefferson promoted science on a national scale. He recommended that Congress commission a survey to accurately chart the coast of America, a project that would later evolve into the National Geodetic Survey. As secretary of state, he headed the patent office and was instrumental in laying the groundwork for patent law.

Though he invented the folding chair, the swivel chair, the polygraph and many other items that we today take for granted, Jefferson never patented any of them. Like Benjamin Franklin, he believed in the "natural right of all mankind to share useful improvements without restraint." His inventions and ideas didn't belong to him; they belonged to everyone.

Ilyn Ross said...

Above all, Jefferson popularized the notion that the pursuit of scientific endeavors is an American ideal, one that is crucial to our country's freedom and success. "Science has liberated the ideas of those who read and reflect, and the American example has kindled feelings of right in the people," he said.

Over two centuries ago, Thomas Jefferson helped endow our country with the means to flourish in the world of science. Today, we all have our own opinions on the problems and faults of American science. But despite these shortcomings, I think that Thomas Jefferson would be proud of all that we have accomplished. To honor his instrumental contribution, we must make every effort to uphold America's lead in science and innovation.

Ilyn Ross said...

http://www.realclearscience.com/blog/2012/02/thomas-jefferson-citizen-scientist.html

Ilyn Ross said...

Benjamin Franklin: Founding Father, Citizen Scientist

http://www.realclearscience.com/blog/2012/01/ben-franklin-citizen-scientists.html

Ilyn Ross said...

In 1776, when SC said it would bury the Resolution for Independence if the slavery clause is not removed, BENJAMIN FRANKLIN and JOHN ADAMS, who were virulently anti slavery, had to decide which was the more important value. THOMAS JEFFERSON, who wrote the Declaration of Independence, including the long condemnation of slavery, had to decide.

"The ground of liberty is to be gained by inches, [and] we must be contented to secure what we can get from time to time and eternally press forward for what is yet to get. It takes time to persuade men to do even what is for their own good." - Thomas Jefferson

If you are writing in Ron Paul or voting for Gary Johnson, you are deluding yourself if you hold that you are voting on principle. You are voting for anarchy.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=yk5NAeIRY4k&feature=related

Ilyn Ross said...

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Libertarianism_and_Objectivism

http://www.aynrand.org/site/PageServer?pagename=education_campus_libertarians

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Libertarianism

Ilyn Ross said...

Gary Johnson has joined a party whose founding principle is anarchism. GJ is anti Declaration of Independence.

This is an excerpt from a Ludwig Von Mises Institute article - "Many libertarians abandon minarchy in favor of anarchy when they realize that even a minarchist government is unlibertarian.”

Wikipedia states: Anarcho-capitalist Murray Rothbard has stated that "Capitalism is the fullest expression of anarchism, and anarchism is the fullest expression of capitalism." Anarcho-capitalism is an individualist anarchist political philosophy that advocates the elimination of the state...

This is from the Young Americans for Liberty's Mission Statement: "WE, as Young Americans for Liberty believe: THAT government is the negation of liberty..."

Ilyn Ross said...

PBS and The Washington Post had DNA information exonerating Jefferson in their possession when they ran their stories claiming he was the father.

http://patriotupdate.com/articles/liberal-lies-about-americas-founders#.UBxzN5XPSIU.facebook

Ilyn Ross said...

"I wish it were possible to obtain a single amendment to our Constitution. I would be willing to depend on that alone for the reduction of the administration of our government to the genuine principles of its Constitution; I mean an additional article, taking from the federal government the power of borrowing. I now deny their power of making paper money or anything else a legal tender." - Thomas Jefferson

http://www.yamaguchy.com/library/jefferson/taylor.html

Ilyn Ross said...

JEFFERSON (Thomas), A Nailmaker.— In our private pursuits it is a great advantage that every honest employment is deemed honorable. I am myself a nail-maker, On returning home after an absence of ten years, I found my farms so much deranged that I saw evidently they would be a burden to me instead of a support till I could regenerate them; and, consequently, that it was necessary for me to find some other resource in the meantime. I thought for a while of taking up the manufacture of potash, which requires but small advances of money. I concluded at length, however, to begin a manufacture of nails, which needs little or no capital, and I now employ a dozen little boys from ten to sixteen years of age, overlooking all the details of their business myself, and drawing from it a profit on which I can get along till I can put my farms into a course of yielding profit. My new trade of nail-making is to me in this country what an additional title of nobility or the ensigns of a new order are in Europe.

T. Jefferson to M. de Meunier. Ford ed., vii, 14. (M., 1795.)

http://books.google.com/books?id=2D0gAAAAIAAJ&pg=PA439#v=onepage&q&f=false

Ilyn Ross said...

"In general, it can probably be said that the conservative does not object to coercion or arbitrary power so long as it is used for what he regards as the right purposes. He believes that if government is in the hands of decent men, it ought not to be too much restricted by rigid rules. Since he is essentially opportunist and lacks principles, his main hope must be that the wise and the good will rule – not merely by example, as we all must wish, but by authority given to them and enforced by them.[7] Like the socialist, he is less concerned with the problem of how the powers of government should be limited than with that of who wields them; and, like the socialist, he regards himself as entitled to force the value he holds on other people."

http://www.lewrockwell.com/orig6/hayek1.html

Ilyn Ross said...

http://www.jeffersonianparty.com/platform.asp

Ilyn Ross said...

http://naturalscience.com/ns/letters/ns_let21.html

Since its publication, Dr. Foster has admitted that the evidence presented in his Nature article (1) does not provide conclusive proof that Thomas Jefferson fathered Eston Hemings, the youngest child of Jefferson's slave Sally Hemings (3,4), yet neither Dr. Foster nor Nature will issue a retraction of, or correction to, the article's highly misleading title. This is a serious omission because we rarely attend to the details of what is published, just headlines and sound bites.

Ilyn Ross said...

Jeffersonian or Hamiltonian?

"Our Constitution was forged as a compromise between the Jefferson and Hamilton forces, with James Madison acting as the eternal tightrope-walker and fence-straddler between the two camps. The trappings, the rhetoric, the specific issues have changed, but the fundamental cleavage remains, unresolved, on the American scene."

http://mises.org/daily/3591

Ilyn Ross said...

Thomas Jefferson on Politics & Government

http://www.famguardian.org/Subjects/Politics/ThomasJefferson/jeffcont.htm

Ilyn Ross said...

"In an age of great men Jefferson was remarkable for his wide-ranging curiosity on many subjects. He helped the United States get started, and his plans for the future helped it grow. Many of the good things Americans enjoy today have come from Jefferson's devotion to human rights....

He is known to everyone as the author of the ringing statement in the Declaration of Independence that all men are created equal, that among their inalienable rights are life, liberty, and the pursuit of happiness. His writings have stood as a torch to the defenders of individual freedom, in spiritual as well as in worldly affairs.

Jefferson was the chief thinker and writer among a group of men who risked their lives, their fortunes, and their honor in fighting against a tradition. This tradition was that people need to be protected against themselves by the rich, the wellborn, the educated, or the powerful. Jefferson was foremost among the influential men who believed that laws should be made by those who are to obey them.

On Government for the Western Territory, the basic document for the growth of the United States... Jefferson's effort to abolish slavery failed by one vote."

http://history-world.org/thomas_jefferson.htm

Ilyn Ross said...

Jefferson did not patent any of his inventions.

"Most people tend to think of Jefferson as a statesman only. Actually he was one of the most versatile and accomplished men in American history. As an agriculturist, he invented a moldboard plow that was widely used for many years. He introduced the threshing machine into the United States, and he encouraged Robert Mills in the development of his mechanical reaper. He was one of the first Americans to employ crop rotation and contour plowing.

As a scientist Jefferson suggested the invention of the stopwatch, in which he was interested not for timing races but for making astronomical observations. He was one of the earliest believers in the possibility of creating a submarine, and he was one of the first prominent men in the United States to submit to inoculation for smallpox. He had his children inoculated as well.

As an architect, Jefferson designed the 35-room Monticello, one of the most beautiful historic homes in America. He also designed the capitol at Richmond and the original buildings for the University of Virginia. He used elevators and conveyors in his own flour mill and nail factory. Among the mechanical contrivances at Monticello were dumbwaiters, hidden staircases, and an interior weather vane connected with one on the roof. In Monticello's 13 bedrooms, all the beds were simply mattress supports hung on wall hooks. He is said to have invented the lever-operated double door opener, still often seen today on trains and buses, and the folding chair both of the common type and of the shooting-stick type, now used by sports spectators. Even in his own day he was credited with the invention of the swivel chair. He is often called the Father of the Patent Office, because the nation's first patent laws were administered by him as secretary of state. One of his official acts was to grant Eli Whitney a patent for the cotton gin."

http://history-world.org/thomas_jefferson.htm